Tag Archives: business

The Surprising Benefits of Manager/Employee Interactions

| Julie Giulioni | Leave a comment Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Leadership IQ released a study called “Optimal Hours with the Boss.” It’s an insightful report based upon research conducted with more than 30,000 executives, managers, and employees in North America. The results understandably made news. The findings are profound: “The median time people spend interacting with their leader is 3 hours. But 3 hours spent per week interacting with one’s leader is not enough. For the 32,410 people in this study, the optimal amount of time to spend interacting with one’s leader is 6 hours.” This is helpful information indeed and a welcome metric for managers who are increasingly looking …

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Posted in Leadership Matters
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Which Comes First?

| Julie Giulioni | Leave a comment Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

In preparation for an upcoming executive education session, I conducted a quick pulse survey earlier this month. I wanted to understand whether the leaders attending my training believe that there is a difference in the importance of career development to their employees based upon their current level of performance. And they do. A Picture of Perceptions The leaders polled perceive that career development is a pressing priority for their top performers. Nearly 75% indicate that it’s ‘very important’ to these exceptional employees and more than 20% rate it ‘somewhat important.’ They experience a high level of interest, attention, and motivation …

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Posted in Career Matters, Leadership Matters
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Redefine Results by Redefining Career Development

| Julie Giulioni | 6 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Given repeated rounds of downsizing, reorganizing, right sizing, and all of the other ‘zings’ that have befallen organizations, it’s easy to scan the landscape and come to the conclusion that career development options have shrunk… that they are few and far between for most employees.  After all: Delayering has left already lean organizations with fewer stops along the food chain. Organizations continue to pursue outsourcing in the eternal quest for cost reduction. Baby boomers are not only having the audacity to live longer… but they’re also working longer and occupying chairs that in the past would have be vacated for …

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Give ‘Em Some Space (For Possibilities)

| Julie Giulioni | 6 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

A significant dimension of leadership is coaching… engaging in conversations that help others make the leap from where they are to where they want (or need) to be. Whether the focus is on correcting a performance problem, expanding capacity, improving relationships, or developing within one’s career, coaching is a powerful tool for supporting others as they grow, achieve, and realize their full potential. Whether you’ve been formally trained or have simply picked it up by watching others, you’ve likely learned about the ‘mechanics’ of coaching…. and that questions are the tools of the trade.  Effective coaches construct a conversation (or, …

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The Kids’ Table

| Julie Giulioni | 1 Comment Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

What happened to ‘employee involvement’? Has it gone out of vogue?  Has it been replaced by new initiatives?  These are questions I’ve come up against recently as I’ve worked with organizations across a variety of industries. The most pointed (and poignant) way I’ve heard the issue raised was from a gracious, intelligent, capable professional who shared: “I feel like they’re making me sit at the kids’ table.” We all can relate to this. Remember those awkward ‘tween years when you weren’t grown up enough to join the adults but were clearly too grown up to eat with the kiddies with …

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Posted in Leadership Matters
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OCD: The Unexpected Trait That Employees Want (And Organizations Need ) Most In A Leader

| Julie Giulioni | 2 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

While obsessive-compulsive disorder may come in handy in some business settings, the ‘OCD’ that employees want most from their leaders is something very different. It’s an obsession with career development. According to a recent study by Lee Hecht Harrison, 91% of employees polled report that career development is among their top priorities. Being able to learn, grow, and expand their capacity is of vital importance to most individuals.  It’s also of vital importance to organizations interested in staying ahead of the customer demand curve, continuously improving products and services, and delivering shareholder value. Yet only a small percentage of employees are actually …

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The Pernicious 4Ps that Undermine Career Development Satisfaction

| Julie Giulioni | 5 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Career development consistently appears at the bottom of most organizations’ climate and engagement surveys. Employees routinely express their displeasure with the options, possibilities, and moves available to them… as well as the organization’s overall commitment to their growth. And managers are no happier. They lament the time they must find – generally deep into their nights and weekends – to support the development of those who report to them. If you find yourself in either camp, it’s likely that a large source of the problem – and your unhappiness with career development – traces back to one of the pernicious …

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Posted in Career Matters
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Should the ‘Ship’ Sail on Leadership Development?

| Julie Giulioni | 4 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

For decades, leadership development has been a significant focus of businesses worldwide. Billions of dollars and millions of hours have been invested in a wide range of activities to build the capacity and effectiveness of those charged with guiding and directing organizations and the people within them. But today, many organizations are implementing a small change in semantics that could lead to big changes in terms of their leadership development efforts. They’re dropping the ‘ship’ and focusing on leader development instead. What difference can the absence of four letters in a word make? A lot. Leadership development in many organizations …

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To Lead or Not to Lead: Most Employees Say “Not”… but Many Go For It Anyway

| Julie Giulioni | 1 Comment Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Most workers don’t aspire to leadership roles. That’s the key finding of a study conducted earlier this year by CareerBuilder and Harris Poll. Based upon the responses of more the 3500 workers across the United States, only about one-third (34%) aspire to leadership positions. This is interesting data for organizations and leaders everywhere. First, it might settle the nerves of managers and supervisors because it confirms that not every employee is looking to rise up through the ranks. My research with Beverly Kaye found that one of the key reasons managers don’t engage in career conversations with their employees is …

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Posted in Leadership Matters
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Persistence and the Panoramic View

| Julie Giulioni | 4 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

We’ve all read or heard about the inspirational stories of those who persevered through adversity, disappointment, and rejection but tried just one more time… and enjoyed tremendous payoffs as a result. Henry Ford went broke five times before founding Ford Motor Company. Dr. Seuss opened 27 rejection letters before publishing his first book. Walt Disney was fired for having ‘no imagination’. Colonel Sanders endured 1,000+ rejections before his now famous chicken recipe was picked up. Thomas Edison resolutely waded through 1,000 unsuccessful attempts before inventing the light bulb. And they were just that – stories – to me until last …

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Posted in Happiness Matters
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