Tag Archives: managing a team

Attenuating Attrition: How Leaders Can Create a Sticky Situation

| Julie Giulioni | 4 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

As I led a recent session with regional executives within a global organization, the conversation turned to retention—or more accurately, attrition. The most senior leaders lamented their powerlessness over the dynamic facing them. They described a talent market that valued a level of progression, compensation and benefits that exceeded what was expected—or accommodated—anywhere else in the world. And they expressed their frustration that global corporate standards for consistency tied their hands when it came to being able to take action locally to retain their high-value employees. It’s a conversation that plays out daily with managers, even at the most senior …

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If Not the Annual Performance Appraisal, Then What?

| Julie Giulioni | 7 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

The annual performance appraisal might be among the most reviled of time-honored workplace traditions. And it makes sense. Managers must invest countless hours in a process that endeavors to boil a year’s worth of a human being’s contribution down to a series of check boxes, numeric ratings, and bulleted highlights. Employees—those human beings whose contributions are being over-simplified—may look forward to a chance to discuss their performance (since those conversations generally happen infrequently) but often leave feeling empty, demoralized, and undervalued. As organizations like Microsoft, Adobe Systems, and The Gap jump ship on the traditional performance appraisal and the press …

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Employee recognition: The KISS… method

| Julie Giulioni | 3 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Recognition may be among today’s most heavily researched leadership and supervision topics. And the results are consistently disturbing: According to studies by Badgeville research, 79% of those who quit their jobs cite lack of appreciation as the main reason. Wichita State University research reported that 81% of employees seldom or never received public praise, 76% seldom or never received written thanks from their managers, and 58% rarely or never received praise from their manager. Gallups’s global research finds that employees around the world consistently express dissatisfaction with feedback and recognition. Making these findings all the more disconcerting is additional research …

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Posted in Happiness Matters, Leadership Matters
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Closing the “discretionary effort” gap

| Julie Giulioni | 1 Comment Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Be honest. If you had a gas or water leak, you’d fix it. If an investment was draining your portfolio, you’d sell. So, why are so many smart leaders willing to accept “discretionary effort” as an inevitable feature of — and drain on — business today? Why do we allow employee energy — a precious natural resource — to routinely be wasted? Condoned sub-optimization Discretionary effort is the difference between the effort an employee is capable of bringing to a job or task and the effort actually required to just get by. According to Impact Achievement Group research, “The average …

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