Category Archives: Learning Matters

When the Growing Gets Tough

| Julie Giulioni | 2 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Think about the learning that contributed most powerfully to your development and who you are today. Consider the experiences that built the expertise you use and value most every day. Reflect on what you’re most proud of mastering during the course of your career or life. This memorable learning that has made a significant difference to you (and to the organizations you’ve served) likely didn’t come easily. The kind of learning that sticks with people, helping them achieve lifelong results, generally: Challenges them to change how they think, act, or perform in new ways. Takes significant energy and attention. Involves …

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Log On to Listen

| Julie Giulioni | 2 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

The changing nature of communication is a popular topic in professional journals and water-cooler conversations. The use of electronic media — e-mail, texts, instant messaging, discussion boards, social media and more — is applauded or vilified. But everyone agrees on one thing: technology has dramatically changed the business landscape and nature of communication. In this ongoing dialogue, considerable attention is given to how to communicate online and advice abounds: Keep it short and to the point; Make sure your subject line includes the action required; If you wouldn’t say it to the other person, don’t write it; etc. But few …

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“Not My Decision”: Constructive Responses to Workplace Decisions You Wouldn’t Have Made

| Julie Giulioni | Leave a comment Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Last week, many Americans had a profound experience of what employees encounter routinely on the job: responding to a decision they don’t support but must still live with. In organizations worldwide, strategies are set, markets are selected, tactics are identified…and not everyone agrees with the direction. When confronted with these situations, it’s easy for employees to feel powerless and out of control. Yet no matter the issue or the organizational level (of those deciding or those following in the wake of the decision), what remains well within each individual’s control is how he or she responds. Employees who find the …

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Posted in Happiness Matters, Learning Matters
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Training: The New School

| Julie Giulioni | 1 Comment Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Guest Post by Dr. Stacy Feiner I’m delighted to celebrate the launch of Talent Mindset with this guest post by Dr. Stacy Feiner.  In her just-released book, Stacy provides a step-by-step process for acquiring, developing and deploying people within any organization. It’s no-nonsense, in-the-trenches advice that will help any leader make the most of his or her most valuable asset, talent. Here are important questions to ask yourself: How is training being delivered at your organization? How are your people learning? What tools are you providing to facilitate engaged mindshare? I find so often that business owners are locked into …

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Posted in Leadership Matters, Learning Matters
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Looking for Lasting Commitment… Beyond Engagement

| Julie Giulioni | 5 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Leaders are enamored with employee engagement. They repeatedly conduct surveys to assess it and hold meetings to address it. Yet, despite the millions of dollars that are invested annually, engagement continues to be among employees’ biggest disappointments and management’s top challenges. Maybe it’s time to re-think our expectations… to reframe the issue… to take the next logical step. What’s beyond engagement?  Well, in life outside of work, it’s typically marriage. ROMANTIC PARALLELS Couples enter into a romantic engagement as a transition to another, more committed state. In 2010, the average time from proposal to wedding was 15 months. ‘Five years’ …

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Develop or Die

| Julie Giulioni | 2 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

There seems to be a trend in development today… maybe you’ve noticed it.  Perhaps because they’re woefully overburdened with spans of control that are inhuman and inhumane, or perhaps because training and development budgets have been cut to the bone yet again leaving in their wake a sense of scarcity, or perhaps because the corporate ladder has narrowed dramatically and the rungs that are left look a bit rickety – whatever the reason, managers are willingly accepting their employees’ lack of interest in development. Working with several organizations recently, I’ve experienced many managers who respond with relief when their employees …

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Carnival of HR: The Emerging Trends Edition

| Julie Giulioni | 2 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

As mid-year approaches, it’s the ideal time to step back and reflect on some of the most profound Human Resources trends, patterns, and challenges… and, more importantly, identify what organizations could/should do to respond to them. Some of the best thinkers in the field share their observations and recommendations that HR – and all leaders in all functions – may want to seriously consider as they build plans to bring home strong results this year and beyond. You’ll be informed by authors, practitioners, and experts who are grappling with these challenges everyday.  And you just might be inspired to respond …

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Posted in Learning Matters
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A Challenge to the Training Function: Is Learning a Two-Way Street?

| Julie Giulioni | Leave a comment Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Despite high levels of engagement, facilitative delivery styles, and even attempts at user-generated content, most training is still a fairly one-way communication vehicle; the trainer shares information, guides some discussion, and builds the group’s knowledge… all of which is important. But learning professionals are exposed to a lot of valuable data and input in the classroom: off-handed comments about customers and the culture; diatribes about working conditions; angst over lack of resources, tools, or equipment; frustration about work processes (or lack thereof). What if we found a way to systematically gather this input and funnel employee ‘intel’ back into the …

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Unconscious Competence or Catatonic Complacency?

| Julie Giulioni | 2 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

If you’ve attended more than a workshop or two in your career, you’ve likely been introduced to the four stages of competence or the four stages of learning any new skill.  Developed in the 1970’s by Noel Burch, this model describes the process by which new skills are acquired: Unconscious incompetence: You’re blissfully ignorant of what you don’t yet know. Conscious incompetence: You recognize the need for a particular skill and may even be aware of some of the steps to get there, but cannot yet perform it. Conscious competence: You know how to perform the skill and can be …

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Closing the Door… on Closure

| Julie Giulioni | 2 Comments Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  Share on Facebook  Share with Email

Poll ten highly successful people and you’ll likely find that nine have a very high need for closure.  You know that you’re among them if you: Feel most comfortable when a meeting ends with a good recap and solid next steps. Get an unusual sense of satisfaction out of crossing things off your to-do list. Consistently are the one who can tell others where they left off with a story (primarily because you really need to know how it ended). Sit in the car a moment longer to hear the end of the song. While there’s a narrow, psychological definition …

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